Nostalgia...“Remembering the Apron”

The audience loved getting a close up look at all the aprons, especially this one with a fl ocking design.

Isn’t it intriguing...the sights, sounds, and smells that can trigger a memory? For several Rotary Senior Living residents, it was something as simple as aprons that brought the thoughts of days gone by flooding back.

The memories were thanks to the presentation of Sheila Craig, originally from Decorah, Iowa, who showed off her collection of more than a hundred aprons (although she has several hundred that she owns) at the Eagle Grove Memorial Library. With a collection of her mother’s aprons, her mother-in-law’s, her great-grandmother inlaw’s, her own, and many donated from friends and even strangers, Craig has been presenting her “Remembering the Apron” program at libraries, retirement and care facilities, churches, and more for the past 15 years. She was thrilled to be able to make her first-ever visit to Eagle Grove on Monday, July 1.

Although it may seem like a lost kitchen necessity for many women today, aprons were once in abundance at many households. Women wore them for a variety of household chores like cooking, baking, doing laundry and more. Men wore aprons too - mostly for professional careers like a butcher, a barber, a blacksmith, welders, etc. While the men’s were mostly for functionality, the women wanted a little more - usefulness and style.

For the full story, see this week's Eagle Grove Eagle. Subscribe by calling 1-800-558-1244 ext 122 or email Deb at circulation@midamericapub.com or by clicking here